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Recommended Immunizations for Children from 7 through 18 years Old: By Age

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Recommended Immunizations for Children from 7 through 18 years Old: By Age

United States, 2014


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7-10 years
    
11-12 years
    
13-18 years
Tdap1Tetanus,Diphtheria,Pertussis (Tdap) VaccineTdap
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (3 Doses)2HPV
MCV4Meningococcal Conjugate (MCV4) Vaccine Dose 13MCV4 Dose 13Booster at age 16 years
Influenza (Yearly)4
Pneumococcal Vaccine5
Hepatitis A (HepA) Vaccine Series6
Hepatitis B (HepB) Vaccine Series
Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) Series
Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) Vaccine Series
Varicella Vaccine Series
 These shaded boxes indicate when the vaccine is recommended for all children unless your doctor tells you that your child cannot safely receive the vaccine. These shaded boxes indicate the vaccine should be given if a child is catching-up on missed vaccines. These shaded boxes indicate the vaccine is recommended for children with certain health conditions that put them at high risk for serious diseases. Note that healthy childrencan get the HepA series6. See vaccine-specific recommendations atwww.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/ACIP-list.htm

Footnotes:

  1. Tdap

    Tdap vaccine is combination vaccine that is recommended at age 11 or 12 to protect against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. If your child has not received any or all of the DTaP vaccine series, or if you don't know if your child has received these shots, your child needs a single dose of Tdap when they are 7-10 years old. Talk to your child's health care provider to find out if they need additional catch-up vaccines.

  2. HPV

    All 11 or 12 year olds-both girls and boys-should receive 3 doses of HPV vaccine to protect against HPV-related disease. Either HPV vaccine (Cervarix® or Gardasil®) can be given to girls and young women; only one HPV vaccine (Gardasil®) can be given to boys and young men.

  3. MCV

    Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV) is recommended at age 11 or 12. A booster shot is recommended at age 16. Teens who received MCV for the first time at age 13 through 15 years will need a one-time booster dose between the ages of 16 and 18 years. If your teenager missed getting the vaccine altogether, ask their health care provider about getting it now, especially if your teenager is about to move into a college dorm or military barracks.

  4. Flu

    Everyone 6 months of age and older-including preteens and teens-should get a flu vaccine every year. Children under the age of 9 years may require more than one dose. Talk to your child's health care provider to find out if they need more than one dose.

  5. Pneumococcal

    Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) and Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV23) are recommended for some children 6 through 18 years old with certain medical conditions that place them at high risk. Talk to your healthcare provider about pneumococcal vaccines and what factors may place your child at high risk for pneumococcal disease.

  6. Hepatitis A

    Hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for older children with certain medical conditions that place them at high risk. HepA vaccine is licensed, safe, and effective for all children of all ages. Even if your child is not at high risk, you may decide you want your child protected against HepA. Talk to your health care provider about HepA vaccine and what factors may place your child at high risk for HepA.

If you are travelling outside the United States, you may need additional vaccines
Ask your health care professional about which vaccines you may need at least 6 weeks prior to your travel.

This schedule is approved by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAPExternal Web Site Icon), the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFPExternal Web Site Icon), and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOGExternal Web Site Icon).

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