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Easy-to-Read Schedule for Children, Birth through 6 Years Vaccine Schedule

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Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 years Old: By Age

United States, 2014


Print PDF document of this schedule




Birth

1 month

2 months

4 months

6 months

12 months

15 months

18 months

19-23
months

2-3
years

4-6
years
HepBHepBHepB
RVRVRV
DTaPDTaPDTaPDTaPDTaP
HibHibHibHib
PCVPCVPCVPCV
IPVIPVIPVIPV
Influenza(Yearly)*
MMRMMR
VaricellaVaricella
HepA§
 Shaded boxes indicate the vaccine can be given during shown age range.

Key:

HepB: HepB vaccine protects against hepatitis B.

RV: RV vaccine protects against rotavirus.

DTaP: DTaP vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough).

Hib: Hib protects against Haemophilus influenzae type b.

PCV: PCV vaccine protects against pneumococcus.

IPV: IPV protects against polio.

Influenza: Influenza protects against flu.

MMR: MMR protects against measles, mumps and rubella.

Varicella: Varicella protects against chickenpox.

HepA: HepA vaccine protects against hepatitis A.

Footnotes:

*Two doses given at least four weeks apart are recommended for children aged 6 months through 8 years of age who are getting a flu vaccine for the first time and for some other children in this age group.

§Two doses of HepA vaccine are needed for lasting protection. The first dose of HepA vaccine should be given between 12 months and 23 months of age. The second dose should be given 6 to 18 months later. HepA vaccination may be given to any child 12 months and older to protect against HepA. Children and adolescents who did not receive the HepA vaccine and are at high-risk, should be vaccinated against HepA.

If your child has any medical condition that put him at risk for infection or is travelling outside the United States, talk to your child's doctor about additional vaccines that he may need.

Note: If your child misses a shot, you don't need to start over, just go back to your child's doctor for the next shot. Talk with your child's doctor if you have any questions about vaccines.

This schedule is approved by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAPExternal Web Site Icon), the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFPExternal Web Site Icon), and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOGExternal Web Site Icon).


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